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Sjogren’s Awareness – Understanding The Invisible Disease 

In an effort to spread the word to increase awareness about Sjogren’s Disease, eye care providers are speaking out about this hard-to-diagnose condition.

Sjogren’s is a systemic autoimmune disorder that can affect the whole body. One of the primary symptoms is excessive dryness particularly in the eyes and mouth. Other serious symptoms include chronic fatigue and pain, specifically in the joints, as well as major organ dysfunction. The syndrome also increases chances of neuropathies and lymphomas. 

The severity of the disease varies greatly, ranging from mild discomfort to debilitating symptoms that can seriously impair normal functioning in everyday life. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent serious complications and improve quality of life. There is currently no cure for Sjogren’s, yet there are treatments for many of the individual symptoms. On average patients are prescribed upwards of 8 medications to treat the wide range of symptoms. 

Women are nine times more likely to develop Sjogren’s than men and diagnosis usually occurs around the age of 40. Unfortunately, because the symptoms vary from person to person, and the disease often occurs in the presence of or mimics other diseases (such as lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, menopause, allergies or multiple sclerosis) the disease is often misdiagnosed or overlooked. Further, because the symptoms can affect different parts of the body system such as the teeth, eyes or musculoskeletal system, various health professionals are sought to diagnose or treat specific symptoms (such as rheumatologists, dentists or eye doctors) while the big picture is often missed. On average it takes almost three years to obtain a Sjogren’s diagnosis once symptoms are noticed.  

Since dry eye is one of the most common early symptoms of the disease, there has been an effort to educate eye care providers to recognize and to be aware to look for symptoms of the disease. Patients also need to be aware and proactive about speaking to their health care providers about potential diagnosis and treatment. Knowing the risk factors and symptoms can be imperative to a faster diagnosis. 

Your eye doctor may be able to detect and diagnose Sjogren's syndrome from dry eye symptoms as well as other diagnostic tests and review of symptoms. With this diagnosis the treatment will be different from typical dry eye disease. Since it is an autoimmune disease, lubricating eye drops may provide temporary relief but will not address the source of the problem. Your doctor may prescribe newer cyclosporine drops as well to treat the inflammatory response. If you have dry eyes and typical treatments aren’t working, it may be worthwhile to ask about Sjogren’s. 

Sjogren’s patients often feel misunderstood because most of the debilitating symptoms are not visible to others and the disease is often not recognized largely due to a lack of awareness. By increasing both public and professional awareness, the goal is to reduce diagnosis time and to advance research on the cure for this disorder.

Armstrong & Small Eyecare Centre - COVID-19 Update - March 18, 2020

Due to the recent COVID-19 outbreak, we have made the difficult decision to close starting Wednesday, March 18 and we are hoping (depending on the conditions) that we will re-open on Monday, April 6th.

In our attempts to be as socially distant as possible and to protect you, our staff and all of our families, we recommend staying at home and following all of the precautions that have been set out by the city, province and the nation.

If you have specific questions about glasses, contact lenses or any other non-emergency / non-essential items please email us at info@armstrongandsmall.com and we will do our best to accommodate your request. As part of our services, we are happy to provide you the option of having your contact lenses sent directly to your home. If you currently have items on order, we will be in touch with you to make arrangements.

If you are calling about a specific ocular or visual emergency such as new flashes and/or floaters, a loss in vision or a suspected eye infection, please text or call Dr. Luke Small at 204-299-6587 or Dr. Matt Lepage at 204-573-8039 who are both providing on-call emergency services through our clinic. Please do this prior to going to Misericordia or to a walk-in clinic as we attempt to reduce their patient load at this time. Obviously, if you have been recently traveling or are experiencing any symptoms related to COVID-19, they will be able to direct you where to go for the proper care.

Please stay home as much as possible and stay safe.

Thank you from your Armstrong & Small Eyecare Team.